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HEALTH SECTOR

The District forms 3.9% of the total land mass (2,981.25km) of the land northern region, bounded to the north by west savelugu/nanton districts and tamale metropolis,to the south by central gonja and to the west by west gonja districts.  the disrict has a projected population of 176,222 from the 2000 population census and an annual growth rate of 2.9%.  there are a total of 237 communities in the district but the directorate has 278 communities for purposes of community based surveillance. 


The district has been sub-divided into five districts for purposes of health administration. there are two (2) major "overseas" communities namely; Singa and Zantani in the Dalun and wantugu sub-districts respectively, with about six smaller settlements each dotted around them.  the district has nineteen (19) health facilities comprising five (5) health centres, eight (8) operational CHPS zones and three community initiated clinics, two RCH clinics and one CHAG fifty-bed capacity hospital (King’s Medical Centre) at  Bontanga in the Dalun  sub-district.


The health situation in the District needs to be improved. There is no district hospital and the existing health centers and few clinics do not have the requisite infrastructure, logistics, equipment and personnel to deliver quality health care. There is a high level of environmentally related diseases/in the district among which are Malaria (which constitute 60% of all reported illnesses), Diarrhea, URTI (upper respiratory tractinfections) and skin infections. CSM outbreaks are also very rampant in the district.


 Despite the substantial efforts made over the last few years, guinea worm is still prevalent in the district. Other health indicators show that children and women are very vulnerable to numerous health problems. There are few health problems such poor feeding habits, poor sanitation practice and £ inadequate food intake resulting in aneg»a»Exclusive breast-feeding practices is more than 76% (linkages-2003) Supervised deliveries, which are as low as 11% and the low practice in the use of family planning contraceptives (8%), constitute a great danger to maternal health and survival.
 
A Brief profile of the Directoratethe District forms 3.9% of the total land mass (2,981.25km) of the Northern Region, bounded to the Nroth by West Mamprusi, East by the south by Central Gonja and to the West by West Gonja Districts.  The District has a projected population of 176,222 from the 2000 population census and an annual growth rate of 2.9%.  

There are a total of 237 communities in the District but, the Directorate has 278 communties for purpose of Community Based Surveillance.  The district has been sub-divided into five districts for purposes of health administration.   There are two (2) major “overseas” communities namely; Singa and Zantani in the Dalun and Wantugu sub-districts respectively, with about six smaller settlements each dotted around them.  The district has Nineteen (19) Health facilities comprising five (5) Health centres, eight (8) operational CHPS zones and three community initiated clinics, two RCH clinics and one CHAG fifty-bed capacity hospital (King’s Medical Centre) at Bontanga in the Dalun sub-district.

Some Facts About Malaria


Malaria, a mosquito-borne infectious disease is caused by a eukaryotic protist of the genus plasmodium, which is widespread in tropical and subtropical regions, including parts of the Americas (22 countries). Asia, and Africa. After a period of between two weeks and several months (occasionally years) spent in the liver, the malaria parasites start to multiply within red blood cells, causing symptoms that include fever, and headache.  In severe cases the disease worsens leading to hallucinations, coma, and death.  Five species of the plasmodium parasite can infect humans: the most serious forms of the disease are caused by plasmodium falciparum.  Malaria cussed by plasmodium visa, plasmodium ovale and plasmodium malariae caused milder disease in human s that is not generally fatal.  A fifth species, plasmodium knowlesi, is a zoonosis that causes malaria in macaques but can also infect humans.
 
Malaria transmission can be reduced by preventing mosquito bites by distribution of inexpensive mosquito nets and insect repellents, or by mosquito-control measures such as spraying insecticides inside houses and draining standing water where mosquitoes lay their eggs Although many are under development, the challenge of producing a widely available vaccine that provides a high level of protection for a Sustained period is still to be met.
 
A variety of anti malarial medication are available. In the last 5 years, treatment of p. falciparum infections in endemic countries has been transformed by the use of combinations of drugs containing an artemisinin derivative. Severe malaria is treated with intravenous or intramuscular quinine or, increasingly, the artemisuun derivative artesunate. Several drugs are also available to prevent malaria in travelers to malaria-endemic countries (prophylaxis). Resistance has developed to several anti malarial drugs, most notably chloroquine.  Each year, there are more than 250 million cases of malaria, killing between one and three million people, the majority of whom are young children in sub-Saharan.  

Malaria Tops them All
On the Chart of Top Ten Diseases Diagnosed in the District


The Malaria disease continues to firmly top the chart of top ten diseases diagnosed clinically in the District. Recorded cases of malaria alone in the District stood at 7,586 as at November this year. This is followed by UTL with 2, 061.  Diarrhoeal disease, though not too common also recorded 1,453. Skin diseases and Ulcers and Hypertension also recorded 992 and 686 respectively, whilst Intestinal worms and Pneumonia also recorded 667 and 654 respectively.
 
Rheumatism and joint pains recorded 578. Others are: Acute Urinary Tract Infections, 494, Anaemia, 594, Hypertension, 441 and Acute Eye Infection, 427.  Despite the many interventions such as the use of Insecticide Treated Nets (ITNS) and Indoor Residual Spraying (TRS) as well as Intermittent Preventive Treatment (IPI) for infants the malarial disease still rampages the District like wildfire.  According to Hajia Sophia A. Mahama, District director of Health Services the rise in Malaria cases in the District is partly due to the fact that people do-not-pay heed to advice on preventive methods such as sleeping under ITNS and the observance of environmental cleanliness.

 

Date Created : 11/21/2017 8:53:37 AM