NEWS ARCHIVE 2010 - 14

FANTEAKWA: FDA to harness tourism potential

The Fanteakwa District Assembly(FDA) is one of the 26 Municipal and District assemblies (MMDAs) in the Eastern Region which was carved out of the old East Akyem District Council by Legislative Instrument (LI) 1411 of 1988, in pursuance of the government’s decentralization policy and local government reform policy.


Date Created : 5/2/2014 9:19:25 AM : Story Author : GhanaDistrict.Com

The Fanteakwa District Assembly(FDA) is one of the 26 Municipal and District assemblies (MMDAs) in the Eastern Region which was carved out of the old East Akyem District Council by Legislative Instrument (LI) 1411 of 1988, in pursuance of the government’s decentralization policy and local government reform policy.

The district, which ranks sixth in the region, in terms of landmass, with an area of 1,150 square kilometers, shares boundaries with other assemblies in the region, including Kwahu South to the West, Kwahu East to the North, East Akyem, Manya Krobo and Yilo, and Atiwa to the South, East and South-West respectively.

The Fanteakwa District Assembly, with its acronym FDA, can boast of a population of 108,614, with males constituting 54,010, whilst females make up 54,604 as at the time of 2010 Population and Housing Census, with its corresponding estimated growth rate of 3.17 percent. The population of the district is dominated by Christians, who constitute about 86.3 percent, and Muslims and traditionalists, 11.2 and 2.5 percent. The religious and sacred roles they play towards the development agenda of the district cannot be underestimated.

The 10 storey building like paradise rockIt is a place worth visiting on any given day, with little or no language barriers, particularly local tourists who would put the place ahead of any other tourist sites, not only in the region, but Ghana, because of its ethnic diversity. The district is dominated by Akans, who constitute 61.3 percent of the entire population, followed by the Ga-Adangbe, 13.1 percent, with others such as Chamba, Kotokoli, Moshie and Ewe making up 11.5 percent, while northerners and Guans account for 6.9 percent and 4.7 percent respectively..

The-10-storey-building-like-paradise-rock

It is naturally gifted with waterfalls and many other tourist attraction sites which have virtually been under-utilised to the benefit of its inhabitants, most of whom are wallowing in abject poverty, amidst school dropouts.

Assuming office in 2009, the District Chief Executive (DCE) of the area, Abass Fuseini Sbaabe, with immense support from the Assembly, decided to research, identify, and develop tourist sites in the district. His effort was rewarded with the discovery of many sites packaged in different fascinating sizes, shapes, and colours that tourists could not resist

One of the numerous water fallsNotable among them are the Akrum Waterfalls situated on the Begoro Apaa road, Trudu Waterfalls at Begoro, and Osuben Waterfalls also at Osubenbuom, which visitors have over the years patronized, especially during festive occasions.

One-of-the-numerous-water-falls

Omotare IslandThe most fascinating site is the Paradise Rock. A natural rock that looks like a ten-floor storey building, with what could be described as rooms and other resting places which has made the district to stand tall in the area of tourism.   The octave palm tree is another handicraft of God that leaves a tourist wondering how it came about. Others include the Omotare Island on the Volta Lake that has attracted numerous tourists from home and abroad as a result of its uniqueness, and the Peseator Caves also called Obadan by the native Akyems, which is a must-see site, where farmers have engaged in farming activities by way of attracting visitors and also providing food for them.

Omotare-Island.

In the quest of the assembly to improve the economic condition of the area, huge sums of money have been pumped into developing some of the sites, if not all, to play host to many tourists, both locally and internationally, leading to jobs creation and increasing the economic potentials. These sites, with some well developed and others being developed, would not only generate income for the assembly, but also open up the district, since the sites would get busy during national holidays, particularly Independence Day celebrations, Farmers Day celebrations, as well as excursions by churches and students alike.

The Palm tree that gave Begoro its nameAccording to the DCE, the forest reserves of the area could be developed for eco-tourism, while the waterfalls and caves, including hills and beautiful physical sites, could lead to finding jobs for the teeming unemployed youth in the area. The district can boast of a radio station, constructed from the assembly’s resources to bring governance to the doorsteps of inhabitants, a significant edifice that would go into the history book of decentralisation in Ghana. The station, which cost the assembly about ¢1.4 billion (old Ghana cedis), was constructed by Three Shades Media and Communication Agency (TSMA), a Tamale-based communications agency.

The-Palm-tree-that-gave-Begoro-its-name

Dilating on the idea behind the establishment of the station, Abass said the intention of the assembly was to deepen grassroots participation in local governance, as well as reach residents with the concepts and activities of the assembly. According to him, it was very worrisome to see assembly members, who had been sent to represent their communities, keep quiet during assembly meetings, whilst members of their respective communities suffer for lack of development. Despite the initial challenges to get the green light from the National Communications Authority (NCA) for a frequency to make the station operational, after several failed attempts, the station has now started with its test transmission.